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What could drivers do in the aftermath of a car accident?

Not seeking immediate medical care when injured or checking on passengers’ condition could be a drastic post-car accident mistake. Drivers who are seemingly “okay” after a collision in Colorado might still need to go to the hospital. And there are other duties that accident victims or at-fault drivers may neglect. In the aftermath of any vehicle accidents, it seems prudent that drivers avoid making disastrous — and typical — mistakes.

Responsibilities after a car accident

An at-fault driver might cause serious problems for themselves by admitting fault. Doing so could make things very challenging in court. Also, the driver might not even know if he/she was entirely at fault or, for that matter, legitimately at fault at all.

The person injured in an accident may benefit from maintaining his/her composure. Fighting with the presumed at-fault driver could make things worse. A physical altercation may lead to a civil suit and potential criminal charges.

Exchanging contact and insurance information might be top priorities. Contacting the police may be wise, as the police report could have value in court or during insurance negotiations.

Things to consider at the accident site

Perhaps all involved may wish to collect witness information and take photographs. Failing to do so may undermine the ability to present evidence.

Anyone injured in an accident must realize that time is not necessarily on his or her side. Colorado, like other states, has statute of limitation rules in effect. Besides that, not contacting an attorney soon after the accident could complicate legal actions. Asking for any witness statements one year after the accident might not yield the most precise recollections. And what happens if evidence such as photographs become lost?

The aftermath of car accidents brings responsibilities. Drivers and others may wish to avoid making mistakes that hurt their health, violate the law or hamper potential civil litigation.

Image of Attorney Chadwick McGrady